Student Code of Conduct

Community College of Denver Student Code of Conduct

Effective June 1, 2014

CCD values involvement, integrity, lifelong learning and excellence. In the spirit of these values, we have the expectation that students adhere to a Code of Conduct, which is reflective of the values of the College.

MISSION STATEMENT: The Office of Student Conduct believes that student learning takes place outside the classroom as well as inside the classroom. Our goal is to use the conduct process as a tool for educating the student on personal conduct, ethical reasoning and community responsibility. We will treat each case individually and each student with respect. We will involve the entire community in a culture of conversation, where reporting is a natural byproduct of a sincere commitment to the safety, security and learning environment of the campus.

The Code of Conduct for the Community College of Denver coincides with The Colorado Community College System policy on Student Disciplinary Procedure.  According to CCCS policy SP 4-30, students are expected to adhere to the Student Code of Conduct and policies and procedures of the college.

AHEC - Refers to the Auraria Higher Education Center.

Cheating - Cheating includes, but is not limited to use of any unauthorized assistance in taking quizzes, tests or examinations, dependence upon the aid of sources beyond those authorized by the faculty member in writing papers, preparing reports, solving problems, or carrying out other assignments, or the acquisition—without permission—of tests or other academic materials belonging to a member of the College faculty, staff, or other students.

Chief Student Services Officer (CSSO) - The individual designated by the College president to administer student affairs and be responsible for administering the College’s Student Conduct Code and this procedure. The CSSO may delegate student discipline to another individual (designee).

Code of Conduct - A document developed and published by each college in the Colorado Community College System, which defines prescribed conduct of students.

College - Refers to the Community College of Denver (CCD).

College Official-  Includes any person employed by the College performing assigned administrative or professional responsibilities.

College or Campus Premises - Includes all land, buildings, facilities, and other property in the possession of or owned, used, or controlled by the Auraria Higher Education Center, including the adjacent streets and sidewalks, and also includes Extended Campus locations such as North Campus and Lowry Campus. This can include online classes as well.

College-Sponsored Activity - Includes, but is not limited to, music and theatre events, student activities, study abroad programs, and student trips funded by the Office of Student Life.

College Suspension or Expulsion - An involuntary separation of the student from the College for misconduct not based on academic performance for a specified period of time.

Suspension - A separation that shall not exceed three academic terms per suspension for any singular offense or situation. While a student is suspended, he or she is not eligible for admission or re-admission at any of the community colleges within CCCS. Additionally, if a student is suspended at any of the other Auraria Campus Institutions (i.e., Metropolitan State University of Denver or the University of Colorado Denver), he or she will not be eligible for admission or re-admission at the Community College of Denver (CCD). Once the suspension is lifted at any of the community colleges within CCCS, the student may be eligible for admission or re-admission.

Examples of suspension include, but are not limited to the following: the College, a department or program, a class, residence hall, use of a college facility or an activity.

Students may be suspended from one class period by the responsible faculty member or adjunct instructor. Longer suspensions can only be implemented by the CSSO or designee in accordance with this procedure.

Expulsion is an indefinite separation from the College. The student is not eligible for admission or re-admission at any of the community colleges within CCCS. Additionally, if a student is expelled at any of the other Auraria Campus Institutions (i.e., Metropolitan State University of Denver or the University of Colorado Denver), he or she will not be eligible for admission or re-admission at CCD.

In exceptional cases where a student wants to be considered for admission or re-admission after an expulsion has been implemented, the student bears the burden to prove the behavior that resulted in the expulsion has been resolved. It is within the  College’s discretion to admit or deny the student.

Conduct Officer or “Chief Student Services Officer” - That person designated by the College president to be responsible for the administration of the Student Code of Conduct.

Day -  Refers to working / business day unless otherwise noted below.

Faculty Member, Instructor, or Adjunct Instructor - Any person hired by the College to conduct classroom or teaching activities or who is otherwise considered by the College to be a member of its faculty.

Impartial Decision Maker - Means the Vice President for Student Affairs or designee.

Interim Action - An immediate action taken by the CSSO to ensure the safety and well-being of members of the College community, preservation of College property, or if the student poses a definite threat of disruption or interference to others or the normal operations of the College. In the event of an interim action, the hearing before the CSSO or designee shall occur as soon as possible following the interim action. If the College issues a permanent sanction, the student shall be afforded appeal rights as discussed below. If the College does not implement a permanent sanction, the interim action will be removed from the student’s record.

Jurisdiction - College jurisdiction applies to student conduct that occurs on or off campus, including while a student or organization is participating in College-sponsored activities, such as study abroad and student travel programs. The College may adjudicate off campus conduct when the continued presence of the student is likely to interfere with the educational process or the orderly operation of the campus, is likely to endanger the health, safety, or welfare of the College community, or the offense committed by the student is of such a serious nature as to adversely affect the student’s suitability as a member of the College community. The Student Code of Conduct shall apply to a student’s conduct even if the student withdraws from school while a disciplinary matter is pending. In relevant cases, the student’s use of electronic media in violating a standard of conduct may be considered in the adjudication process regardless of where the electronic media originated.

Member of the College - Includes any person who is a student, faculty member, College official, or any other person employed by the College.

Notice - Notices, which are required to be given by this procedure, shall be considered served upon the student when given by personal delivery, mailing by certified mail, or emailing the student to their official college email address requesting a delivery receipt notification. If notice is mailed, student shall be given three (3) additional days to respond.

Organization - Means any number of persons who have complied with the formal requirements for College recognition. Student organization requirements can be found in the Student Organization Handbook.

Other Disciplinary Sanction - Fines, restitution, denial of privileges, assignment to perform services for the benefit of the college or community; or other sanction that doesn’t result in the student being denied the right of attending classes.

Plagiarism - Includes, but is not limited to, the use by paraphrase or direct quotations of the published or unpublished work of another person without full and clear acknowledgement. It also includes the unacknowledged use of materials prepared by another person or agency that may or may not be engaged in the selling of term papers or other academic materials.

Policy - Defined as the written regulations of the College as found in, but not limited to, the Student Code of Conduct, the Community College of Denver website, any Auraria Higher Education Center publications, Community College of Denver catalogs and class schedules, and State Board for Community Colleges and Occupational Education (SBCCOE) policies, and Colorado Community College System President’s Procedures.

Preponderance of Evidence - The standard of proof used in all conduct proceedings under this Student Code of Conduct. A preponderance of evidence standard means that it is more likely than not that a violation occurred.

Probation - After a finding of violation of the Code of Conduct, restriction of student’s privileges for a designated period of time, including the probability of more severe disciplinary sanctions if the student is found to be violating any College regulations during the probationary period.

Student - All persons taking courses at or sponsored by the College(s), both full-time and part-time, pursuing both undergraduate credit and non-credit courses, and those concurrently attending secondary or post-secondary institutions and College. Persons who are not officially enrolled for a specific term, but who have a continuing relationship with the College are considered students.

Title IX Coordinator(s) and Title VI and VII Coordinator(s) (EO Coordinator) - The employee(s) designated by the College president to oversee all civil rights complaints.

Warning - A Notice served upon the student advising him/her that he/she is violating or has violated College regulations.

  1. The Office of Student Life and Office of Student Conduct is appointed by the College to adjudicate any potential violations of the Student Code of Conduct.
  2. The Conduct Officer may develop policies for the administration of the Student Conduct program and procedural rules for the conduct of hearings that are consistent with provisions of the Student Code of Conduct, including, but not limited to, the utilization of alternative dispute resolution methods, such as restorative justice and mediation.
  3. Decisions made by the Conduct Officer shall be final, pending the normal appeal process.
  4. The Conduct Officer may extend time limits for good cause demonstrated in writing.
  5. The Conduct Officer may contact the Student Conduct Officers from Metropolitan State University of Denver, the Auraria Higher Education Center, the University of Colorado at Denver, Center for Health Sciences at Lowry on matters that involve students from any or all institutions.

Community College of Denver expects its students to be accountable for their conduct and to represent the College in a positive, responsible manner. The Student Code of Conduct exists to provide parameters for students and their behavior as they represent the College during the entirety of their CCD experience.

Violation of Law & Student Code of Conduct

In most circumstances, the College will treat attempts to commit Code of Conduct violations as if those attempts had been completed.

Proceedings initiated under these procedures are separate from civil or criminal proceedings that may relate to the same incident. Investigations or conduct proceedings by the College are not postponed while criminal or civil proceedings are pending unless otherwise determined by the Conduct Officer.

Conduct that violates student rights and freedoms and is subject to disciplinary action includes, but is not limited to the following points.

Academic Misconduct

Plagiarizing, cheating, or committing any other form of academic misconduct including, but not limited to, unauthorized collaboration, falsification of information, and/or helping someone else violate reasonable standards for academic behavior. Students who engage in any type of academic dishonesty are subject to both academic consequences as determined by the instructor and to disciplinary action as outlined in the CCD disciplinary procedures.

Academic acts of dishonesty/misconduct are handled through the Office of the Provost or designee(s).

Disruptive Behavior

Engaging in any disruptive behavior that negatively affects or impedes teaching or learning (regardless of mode of delivery or class setting) or disrupts the general operation of the College.

Deceptive Acts

Engaging in deceptive acts, including, but not limited to, forgery, falsification, alteration, misrepresentation, non-disclosure, or misuse of documents, records, identification and/or educational materials.

Conduct That Is Detrimental to College or to Campus Safety

Conduct that is deemed detrimental, harmful and/or damaging to the College and/or that jeopardizes the safety of others as determined by the Dean of Student Life or designee.  Examples include, but are not limited to, slamming doors, throwing chairs, and/or defacing of college property, or property of others.

Physical & Non-Physical Abuse

Physical abuse is conduct that threatens or endangers another person’s health or safety. Non-physical abuse includes threats, intimidation, coercion, influence, or any unwelcome conduct in any form that is sufficiently severe, pervasive, or persistent that it alters the conditions of the learning environment or employment. Knowingly falsifying, publishing or distributing, in any form, material that tends to impeach the honesty, integrity, virtue, or reputation of another person.

Harassment and/or Discrimination

Discrimination or harassment on the basis of sex/gender, race, color, age, creed, national or ethnic origin, physical or mental disability, veteran status, pregnancy status, religion, or sexual orientation.

Sexual Misconduct

Sexual Misconduct offenses include, but are not limited to, sexual harassment, non-consensual sexual contact (or attempts to commit same), non-consensual sexual intercourse (or attempts to commit same), and/or sexual exploitation. (See SP 4-120a for more information.)

Weapons

Possession or distribution of any unauthorized firearms, ammunition, explosives, fireworks, and/or other dangerous weapons (or chemicals/flammable liquids), or use/threat of use of any instrument (including, but not limited to, paint ball guns, pellet guns, air soft guns, bow and arrows, knives) as a weapon to intimidate, harass, or cause harm to others.

Narcotics/Alcohol

Using, being under the influence, manufacturing, possessing, cultivating, distributing, purchasing, or selling of alcohol and/or drugs (illegal and/or dangerous or controlled substance) and/or alcohol/drug paraphernalia while on college-owned or college-controlled property, and/or at any function authorized or supervised by the College and/or in state-owned or leased vehicles.

NOTE: Although possession and use of marijuana consistent with the requirements of the Colorado Constitution is no longer a crime in the State of Colorado, the possession and use of marijuana remains illegal under federal law. Consistent with federal law, including the Controlled Substances Act and the Drug Free Schools and Communities Act, the use and/or possession of marijuana continues to be prohibited while a student is on college-owned or college-controlled property, and/or any function authorized or supervised by the College and/or in state-owned or leased vehicles.

Dress Code

Dress or personal hygiene that fails to meet the established safety or health standards of specific classes or activities offered by the College.

Leaving Children Unattended

Leaving children unattended or unsupervised in campus buildings or on campus grounds unless enrolled or participating in authorized campus activities.

Violation of Laws, Directives, & Signage
  • Violating any municipal, county, state, or federal law that adversely impacts the conditions of the educational or employment environment.
  • Violations of college traffic and parking rules, regulations, or signage.
  • Damage to or falsely using fire alarms and/or fire extinguishers.
  • Creating an intentional obstruction that unreasonably interferes with freedom of movement, either pedestrian or vehicular.  This includes, but is not limited to leading or inciting to disrupt college activities. Failure to comply with the lawful directives of College employees acting within the scope of their duties, including those directives issued by a College administrator to ensure the safety and well-being of others.
  • Violations of college policies, protocols, procedures, or signage.
Illegal Gambling

Participation in illegal gambling activities on college-owned or college-controlled property, and/or any function authorized or supervised by the college and/or in state-owned or leased vehicles.

Unauthorized Entry and/or Unauthorized Possession

Entry into, or use of any building, room, or other college-owned or college-controlled property, grounds, or activities without authorized approval. This also includes, but is not limited to, the unauthorized possession, duplication or use of college keys, lock combinations, access codes and access cards, and/or credentials and/or propping open or tampering with doors/windows.

Unacceptable Use of College Equipment, Network or System

Unacceptable uses of any college-owned or operated equipment, network, or system including, but not limited to, knowingly spreading computer viruses, reposting personal communications without author’s consent, copying protected materials, using the network for financial or personal gain, commercial activity, or illegal activity, accessing the network using another individual’s account, unauthorized downloading/uploading software and/or digital video or music, downloading/uploading, viewing, or displaying pornographic content, or any other attempt to compromise network integrity.

Unauthorized Pets/Animals

Possession of any unauthorized pet or animal, excluding trained service animals, while on college-owned or college-controlled property.

Reasonable behavior is expected from service animals while on campus. If a service dog, for example, exhibits unacceptable behavior, the owner is expected to employ the proper training techniques to correct the situation. The owners of disruptive and aggressive service animals may be asked to remove them from college facilities. If the improper behavior happens repeatedly, the owner may be told not to bring the service animal into any facility until they take significant steps to mitigate the behavior. The service animal will be treated as an extension of the student and the student will be held responsible for the service animal’s behavior.

Tampering with Student Organization, Election, or Vote

Tampering with the process of any college recognized student organization, election, or vote.

Group or Organization Conduct

Students who are members of a college-recognized student organization or group and commit a violation of SCOC may be accountable both as an individual and as a member of the student organization.

Abuse of the Student Disciplinary and/or Grievance Procedure

Abuse of the Student Disciplinary and/or Grievance Procedure includes, but is not limited to, the following:

  • Disruption or interference with the orderly conduct of the student disciplinary and/or grievance procedure,
  • Falsification, distortion, or misrepresentation, or knowingly pursuing malicious, frivolous, or fraudulent charges,
  • Attempting to discourage an individual’s proper participation in, or use of, the student disciplinary / grievance procedure,
  • Attempting to influence the impartiality of a participant and/or the student disciplinary and/or grievance procedure,
  • Harassment (verbal or physical) and/or intimidation of a participant in the student disciplinary and/or grievance procedure,
  • Failure to comply with directives and/or sanctions imposed under student disciplinary and/or grievance procedure,
  • Influencing or attempting to influence another person to commit an abuse of the student disciplinary and/or grievance procedure, or
  • Engaging in retaliatory acts in any form against any person or person(s) involved in the student disciplinary and/or grievance procedure.

Violation of College Policies, Rules, or Regulations

Policies are published in hard copy or available electronically on the College website, the Auraria Higher Education Center (AHEC) website, and the Colorado Community College System website, which outlines SBCCOE policies and System president procedures.

Camping/Residing

In accordance with published AHEC policy #30, Auraria campus facilities and grounds shall not be used for camping, regardless of the duration or purpose of the use. Camping shall be defined as the use of Auraria campus facilities or grounds for living accommodations or housing purposes, such as overnight sleeping or making preparations for overnight sleeping (including the laying down of bedding for the purpose of sleeping), the making of any fire for cooking, lighting or warmth, or the erection or use of tents, motor vehicles, or other structures for living or shelter. These activities constitute camping when it reasonably appears, in light of all the circumstances that the participants conducting these activities are intending to use or are using the facilities or grounds for living accommodations or housing, regardless of the duration or other purpose of the use.

Smoking in Buildings and within 25 Feet of Building Entrances

In accordance with AHEC policy, the smoking of any substance is strictly prohibited in all buildings on the Auraria Campus, including those in the institutional neighborhoods and buildings owned by the constituent institutions therein.

Smoking, for the purposes of this policy, shall include the use of e-cigarettes, electronic vaping devices, personal vaporizers, electronic nicotine delivery systems, or other such devices that vaporize substances to simulate smoking.

Because email is an official method of communication for the College, students may be notified over email of potential violations of the Student Code of Conduct.

A. Standard of Proof

The College views the conduct process as a learning experience that can result in growth and personal understanding of one’s responsibilities and privileges within the college community. It is not intended to be a substitute for civil or criminal legal proceedings, and is designed to provide a fair evaluation of whether or not a student has violated the Student Code of Conduct. Formal rules of evidence do not apply in the College’s conduct process. The College uses a preponderance of evidence standard when determining responsibility for alleged violations of the Student Code of Conduct. A preponderance of evidence means that what is alleged to have happened is, more likely than not, what actually happened. This shall be the standard of proof used in all conduct proceedings under this Code.

B. Incident Process

Incident Review

The Conduct Officer reviews all reports and information received from college departments, staff, faculty, officials, students, community members, or police to determine if there is sufficient information to indicate that the Student Code of Conduct has been violated. If the allegations of misconduct are discrimination and/or harassment based on federal or state civil rights laws, the College will investigate those incidents through the Civil Rights Grievance and Investigation Process, System President’s Procedure (SP) 4-31a.

Written Notification

The Conduct Officer or designee will notify the student in writing (via student email) that information has been received, which indicates a potential violation of specific standards in the Code of Conduct. The written notification will provide cursory details of the incident along with the charges. The letter will ask the student to schedule a meeting with the Conduct Officer.

Conduct Meeting

The student will have a chance to meet with the Conduct Officer to discuss the situation. The student will have the opportunity at that meeting to review the written documentation of the incident and present any information that is relevant to the incident.

If the student chooses not to meet with the Conduct Officer within the timeline stated in the written notification, a decision may be made in the student’s absence. In addition, a hold may be placed on the student’s account, which will prevent the student from registering until the process is completed.

Decision

Once the investigation is complete, either through this process or the Civil Rights Grievance and Investigation process, the CSSO or designee shall render a sanction decision. The CSSO or designee may decide that the charges can be disposed of administratively by mutual consent of the parties involved on a basis acceptable to them. If an administrative resolution is not achieved, the CSSO or designee shall issue a decision that determines whether the alleged conduct occurred, whether the conduct violated the Code of Conduct or College procedures, and impose a sanction(s) if appropriate.

Decision Letter

Each incident involving an alleged violation of the Code of Conduct will be concluded with a letter outlining the Conduct Officer’s decision of “responsible” or “not responsible” for the potential charges. The letter will also include any sanctions the Conduct Officer deems appropriate in response to the situation. If a student chooses not to complete the sanctions within the timeline stated in the letter, a hold will be placed on the student’s registration.

Appeal

Any student found responsible for a violation of the Code of Conduct may appeal the decision within seven (7) business days to the Vice President of Student Affairs. Please refer to Section IV.E. for details on the appeal process.

The Student will be informed in writing of the outcome of the appeal.

C. Sanctions

One or more of the following may be imposed when there is a finding that a student has violated the College’s Code of Conduct.

  1. Warning: A Notice served upon the student advising him/her that he/she is violating or has violated College regulations.
  2. Probation: After a finding of violation of the Code of Conduct, restriction of student’s privileges for a designated period of time including the probability of more severe disciplinary sanctions if the student is found to be violating any College regulations during the probationary period.
  3. Other disciplinary sanction:  fines, restitution, denial of privileges, assignment to perform services for the benefit of the college or community; or other sanction that doesn’t result in the student being denied the right of attending classes.
  4. College suspension or expulsion:  An involuntary separation of the student from the College for misconduct not based on academic performance for a specified period of time.
    a. Suspension is a separation that shall not exceed three academic terms per suspension for any singular offense or situation.  While a student is suspended, he or she is not eligible for admission or re-admission at any of the community colleges within CCCS.  Additionally, if a student is suspended at any of the other Auraria Campus Institutions (i.e., Metropolitan State University of Denver or the University of Colorado Denver), he or she will not be eligible for admission or re-admission at the Community College of Denver (CCD). Once the suspension is lifted at any of the community colleges within CCCS, the student may be eligible for admission or re-admission.

    Examples of suspension include, but are not limited to the following:  the college, a department or program, a class, residence hall, use of a college facility or an activity. Students may be suspended from one class period by the responsible faculty member or adjunct instructor.  Longer suspensions can only be implemented by the CSSO or designee in accordance with this procedure. 

    b. Expulsion is an indefinite separation from the college.  The student is not eligible for admission or re-admission at any of the community colleges within CCCS. Additionally, if a student is expelled at any of the other Auraria Campus Institutions (i.e., Metropolitan State University of Denver or the University of Colorado Denver), he or she will not be eligible for admission or re-admission at CCD.

    In exceptional cases where a student wants to be considered for admission or re-admission after an expulsion has been implemented, the student bears the burden to prove the behavior that resulted in the expulsion has been resolved. It is within the college’s discretion to admit or deny the student. 
  5. Interim Action:  An immediate action taken by the CSSO to ensure the safety and well-being of members of the college community; preservation of college property; or if the student poses a definite threat of disruption or interference to others or the normal operations of the college.  In the event of an interim action, the hearing before the CSSO or designee shall occur as soon as possible following the interim action. If the college issues a permanent sanction, the student shall be afforded appeal rights as discussed below.  If the college does not implement a permanent sanction, the interim action will be removed from the student’s record.
  6. Alternative Dispute Resolution:  During the conduct procedures, the conduct officer may determine that an Alternative Dispute Resolution may be effective for repairing the violation.  This resolution may take the following forms: Mediation, Restorative Justice, and other alternatives for a low-level resolution.

D. Appeals

Appeal (as directed in the CCCS Policy SP 4-30)

In the event of an appeal, the Chief Student Services Officer or designee shall give written notice to the other party (e.g., if the accused student appeals, the appeal is shared with the complainant who may also wish to file a response), and then the CSSO or designee will draft a response memorandum (also shared with all parties). All appeals and responses are then forwarded to the appeals officer or committee for initial review to determine if the appeal meets the limited grounds and is timely. The original finding and sanction will stand if the appeal is not timely or substantively eligible, and the decision is final. If the appeal has standing, the documentation is forwarded for consideration. Because the original finding and sanction are presumed to have been decided reasonably and appropriately, the party appealing the decision must specifically cite the error(s) in the original determination on which the appeal is based. The ONLY grounds for appeal are as follows:

  • A material procedural or substantive error occurred that significantly impacted the outcome of the hearing (e.g. substantiated bias, material deviation from established procedures), which must be explained in the written appeal; or
  • To consider new evidence, unavailable during the investigation or hearing that could substantially impact the original finding or sanction. A summary of this new evidence and its potential impact must be included in the written appeal, as well as the reasons the new evidence was not available during the original proceeding.

If the appeals officer or committee determines that a material procedural or substantive error occurred, it may return the complaint to the CSSO or designee with instructions to reconvene to cure the error. In rare cases, where the procedural or substantive error cannot be cured by the CSSO or designee in cases of bias, the appeals officer or committee may order a new hearing be held by a different individual acting in the place of the designated CSSO or designee. The results of a reconvened hearing cannot be appealed. The results of a new hearing can be appealed, once, on the two applicable grounds for appeals.

If the appeals officer or committee determines that new evidence should be considered, it will return the complaint to the CSSO or designee to reconsider in light of the new evidence only. If the subject matter pertains to discrimination and/or harassment pursuant to SP 4-31a, the appeals officer or committee will return the complaint to the Title IX/EO Coordinator to reconsider in light of the new evidence only. The reconsideration of the CSSO, designee, or Title IX/EO Coordinator is not appealable.

The procedures governing the hearing of appeals include the following:

  • All parties should be timely informed of the status of requests for appeal, the status of the appeal consideration, and the results of the appeal decision;
  • If the appeals officer or committee determines there is new evidence or error in the original proceeding, every opportunity to return the appeal to the CSSO or designee for reconsideration (remand) should be pursued;
  • Appeals are not intended to be full re-hearings of the complaint (de novo). In most cases, appeals are confined to a review of the written documentation or record of the original hearing, and pertinent documentation regarding the grounds for appeal;
  • An appeal is not an opportunity for an appeals officer or committee to substitute their judgment for that of the CSSO or designee merely because they disagree with its finding and/or sanctions;
  • Appeals decisions are to be deferential to the original decision, making changes to the findings only where there is clear error and a compelling justification to do so;
  • Sanctions imposed are implemented immediately unless the CSSO or designee stays their implementation in extraordinary circumstances, pending the outcome of the appeal; and
  • The appeals officer or committee will render a written decision on the appeal to all parties within seven (7) days from receiving the appeal request. The committee’s decision to deny appeal requests is final.

E. Release of Disciplinary Information

Disciplinary records are considered education records under the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA). As a result, these records are kept confidential in accordance with this law. Access to any student’s disciplinary file shall be governed by provisions of FERPA, and the Campus Security Act (or “Clery Act”) as amended. A written waiver signed by the student is required for release of disciplinary records to third parties not otherwise mandated by relevant law.

F. Student Conduct Procedure on Record Retention and Review

With the exception of cases in which the College has federally mandated reporting requirements, records will be kept according to the Colorado Community College System Records Retention Schedule.

G. Situational Considerations

Immunity for Victims/Survivors of Sexual Misconduct

Sometimes, victims/survivors are hesitant to report to campus officials because they fear that they themselves may be charged with policy violations, such as underage drinking at the time of the incident. It is in the best interest of this community that as many victims/survivors as possible choose to report to institutional officials. To encourage reporting, the Community College of Denver pursues a practice of offering victims/survivors of sexual misconduct limited immunity from being charged for conduct violations related to the sexual misconduct incident (particularly in regard to alcohol and drugs). While violations cannot be completely overlooked, the institution will provide educational options rather than punishment in such cases. Students who report sexual assault will not have a formal conduct record for alcohol or drug violations.

Good Samaritan

Sometimes students are hesitant to offer assistance to others for fear that they may get themselves in trouble (for example, as a student who has been drinking underage might hesitate to help take a sexual misconduct victim/survivor to the Campus Police). The Community College of Denver pursues a practice of limited immunity for students who offer help to others in need. While policy violations cannot be overlooked, the institution will provide educational options, rather than punishment, to those who offer their assistance to others in need. In these cases, a student will not receive a formal conduct record when seeking assistance for another.

H. Miscellaneous

Time limits for scheduling of hearings may be extended at the discretion of the Impartial Decision Maker. The procedural rights afforded to students above may be waived by the student. Students should be aware of the following policy:

Policy Statement Pursuant to Statute

The Board's policy that there shall be no admission requirements imposed upon any student except those listed below concerning proof of immunization. Admission to a college does not guarantee enrollment in specific programs that may have prerequisites designed to facilitate successful completion. Admission may be denied in accordance with the provisions of this policy.

Proof of Immunization

Traditionally aged students seeking admission to residential colleges must show proof of immunization as required by Section 4, Title 25, Part Nine CRS and implementing rules prior to attending on-campus classes at the College. Nontraditional adult students are defined as those students who have attained the age of 19 years of age or older.

Review of Denial

Review of a denial of admission or denial of continued enrollment or re-enrollment of students shall be in accordance with the college's disciplinary procedures.

Procedures

The System President shall promulgate such procedures as may be necessary for the implementation of this policy.

  1. Any question of interpretation regarding the Student Code of Conduct shall be referred to the Vice President for Student Affairs, Dean of Student Life, Director of Student Conduct, or designee for final determination.

  2. The Student Code of Conduct shall be reviewed periodically (and as needed).