Discrimination & Harassment

Resources

Use the resources available to increase your well-being and safety.

Employees (including administrative/professional technical, faculty, adjunct instructors, and classified employees) and students, authorized volunteers, guests, and visitors can all use these forms to report discrimination or harassment. The Discrimination and Harassment Procedure Documents were put in place to protect and assist our students, staff, and faculty complete the complaint process successfully, safely, and swiftly. For further information and assistance, see the Terms & Definitions tab.

HR-9: Civil Rights Grievance and Investigation Process for Employees
This procedure applies when the accused party (respondent) to a discrimination and/or harassment complaint is an administrator/professional technical employee(s), faculty and adjunct instructor(s), classified employee(s) (Employees), authorized volunteer(s), guest(s) or visitor(s).

HR-8: Civil Rights Grievance and Investigation Process for Students
This procedure applies when the accused party (respondent) to a discrimination and/or harassment complaint is a student.

HR-7: Sexual Misconduct
This procedure applies to all Community College of Denver employees, including administrative/professional technical, faculty, adjunct instructors, and classified employees, students, authorized volunteers, guests and visitors.

Printable Brochures & Posters

Plain Language Definitions

  • A complainant can be an employee, student, authorized volunteer, guest or visitor who has experienced discrimination, harassment or related retaliation.
  • A respondent can be a CCD employee, student, authorized volunteer, guest or visitor whose alleged conduct is the subject of a complaint.
  • Retaliatory harassment occurs when a person who has complained about discrimination or harassment is then treated negatively because of making the report. It may also occur when a person who has participated in a discrimination or harassment investigation is treated negatively because of their participation.

Term Definitions

Click on the definition to read the description and the College policy for that type of harassment.

Discrimination

Discrimination can occur when a person is given a preference because of a personal trait. The result is that people without the trait are at a disadvantage. Discrimination can occur when a person is disadvantaged because of a personal trait. The result is that people without that trait receive an unfair advantage. The traits protected from discrimination are sex/gender, race, color, age, creed, national or ethnic origin, physical or mental disability, veteran status, pregnancy status, religion, or sexual orientation.

Fictional Examples of Discrimination

  • Religion/Creed Discrimination - The supervisor in a computer lab will not hire an applicant who the supervisor perceives to be a Rastafarian because the supervisor thinks Rastafarians are unreliable.
  • Veteran Status/Perceived Disability Discrimination - A recreation center supervisor will not hire veterans because of her fear that the person will have Post Traumatic Syndrome Disorder and disrupt the workplace.
  • Pregnancy Discrimination - The editor of the college newspaper refuses to approve a pregnant student to join the graphics department because the editor assumes the pregnant student will not be able to work once the baby is delivered.
  • National Origin Discrimination - The hiring manager for the College welcome desk wants to project an ‘all-American’ image, so she will not hire anyone who speaks with a foreign accent.
  • Color Discrimination - The director of the CityHawk theater group’s production of Westside Story will not cast an actor with medium or dark skin tones in any lead role.
  • Not a Protected Trait - A student worker has a recent criminal conviction for embezzlement, so the hiring manager does not hire the student worker for a position as a cashier.

College Procedure

Discrimination is any distinction, preference, advantage for or detriment to an individual compared to others that is based upon an individual’s actual or perceived sex/gender, race, color, age, creed, national or ethnic origin, physical or mental disability, veteran status, pregnancy status, religion, or sexual orientation that is severe, persistent, or pervasive, and unreasonably interferes with or limits:

  • Employee’s employment conditions or deprives the individual of employment access or benefits.
  • Student’s ability to participate in, access, or benefit from the College’s educational program or activities.
  • Authorized volunteers’ ability to participate in the volunteer activity.
  • Guests and visitors’ ability to participate in, access, or benefit from the College’s programs.

Read CCD Full Procedures
HR-8: Civil Rights Grievance-Students
HR-9: Civil Rights Grievance-Employees

Discriminatory Harassment

Discriminatory Harassment occurs when a person repeatedly experiences negative treatment towards them because of the person’s trait. The negative behavior can come from one person or multiple individuals.

Fictional Examples of Discriminatory Harassment

  • Disability Harassment - A student has a disability that impacts his speech. Another student teases him by asking the student if he is drunk. The student often mimics the student’s speech in front of other classmates. As a result, the disabled student stops coming to classes.
  • Age Harassment - A student worker is 50-years old. Every day, a staff member in the same department refers to the student as “Geezer” and has told the student not to lift boxes to avoid “a hip going out.” As a result, the student worker quits.
  • Sex Harassment Based on Gender-Stereotyping - A female employee with short-hair who wears pants and a button-down shirt every day is asked by a co-worker if she owns a dress. Another co-worker has given her the nickname “George,” which other staff members have started using too. As a result, the employee begins to miss days at work to avoid her co-workers.
  • Sexual Orientation Harassment by “Outing” - A department chair has informed the dean of his college and other colleagues that a new faculty member is gay. When the new faculty member learns of this, he develops a negative opinion of and tries to limit his contact with his department chair.
  • Sex Harassment - The male administrative assistant who works in an all-female office is teased by his co-workers for having a “woman’s job” and has been told by his supervisor to “be a man” when he complains to her about his co-workers’ conduct. As a result, the male employee no longer feels welcome in the office.

College Procedure

Discriminatory harassment is detrimental action based on an individual’s actual or perceived sex/gender, race, color, age, creed, national or ethnic origin, physical or mental disability, veteran status, pregnancy status, religion, or sexual orientation, which is severe, persistent or pervasive that it unreasonably interferes with or limits:

  • Employee’s working conditions or deprives the individual of employment access or benefits.
  • Student’s ability to participate in, access, or benefit from the College’s educational program or activities.
  • Authorized volunteers’ ability to participate in the volunteer activity.
  • Guests and visitors’ ability to participate in, access, or benefit from the College’s programs.

Read CCD Full Procedures
HR-8: Civil Rights Grievance-Students
HR-9: Civil Rights Grievance-Employees

Sexual Harassment

Sexual Harassment is a form of discrimination based on a person’s sex or gender. There are three types of sexual harassment.

The first way is called quid pro quo and occurs when someone is propositioned for a date, sexual intercourse, or other sexual acts in exchange for a benefit or to avoid a penalty. The second type of sexual harassment is the hostile environment that occurs when a person is subjected to conduct of a sexual nature and the experience begins to negatively impact the person’s employment or education. The third type of sexual harassment is called retaliatory harassment, which occurs when someone who has complained about sexual harassment begins to experience negative treatment because of the complaint.

Fictional Examples of Sexual Harassment

  • Sexual Harassment Type 1 - An assistant professor tells a student that if he engages in sexual acts with the professor, the student will receive an A in the class.
  • Sexual Harassment Type 1 - An employee tells her assistant that he will be terminated unless the assistant agrees to engage in sexual acts with her.
  • Sexual Harassment Type 2 - A student has asked an employee for a date on several occasions. The employee has rejected the invitations, but the student continues to request dates, becoming more aggressive in his approach. The employee feels comfortable and avoids leaving the office, which has impacted her ability to do her job.
  • Sexual Harassment Type 2 - A student watches pornographic videos during class, which are visible to the other students in the room and the student often tells sexually explicit jokes to his classmates. As a result, several students transfer to another class.
  • Sexual Harassment Type 2 - A male student is threatened by another student for wearing make-up. As a result, the male student is afraid to return to campus.
  • Sexual Harassment Type 3 - A staff member complained about sexual harassment committed by an administrator. The administrator is friends with the staff member’s supervisor. The supervisor cuts the staff member’s hours, which causes the staff member to lose his health insurance benefits.

College Procedure

Sexual harassment is unwelcome, gender-based verbal or physical conduct that is sufficiently severe, persistent, or pervasive that it has the effect of unreasonably interfering with, denying, or limiting someone the ability to participate in or benefit from CCD’s educational program and/or activities, or work activities, and the unwelcome behavior may be based on power differentials (quid pro quo), the creation of a hostile environment, or retaliation.

Type 1 - Quid pro quo sexual harassment exists when there are unwelcome sexual advances, requests for sexual favors, or other verbal or physical conduct of a sexual nature, and, submission to or rejection of such conduct results in adverse educational or employment action; or affects the terms or conditions of education or employment, or activities with the College.

Type 2 - Hostile environment includes any situation in which there is harassing conduct that is sufficiently severe, persistent, or pervasive that it alters the conditions of employment or limits, interferes with or denies educational benefits or opportunities, from both a subjective (the alleged victim’s) and an objective (reasonable person’s) viewpoint.

Type 3 - Retaliatory harassment is any adverse employment or educational action taken against a person because of the person’s perceived participation in a complaint or investigation of discrimination or sexual misconduct.

Read CCD Full Procedures
HR-7: Sexual Harassment Procedure

Sexual Misconduct

Sexual Misconduct includes all conduct of a sexual nature that is unwelcome, non-consensual, or abusive. There are four types of sexual misconduct.

Fictional Examples of Sexual Misconduct

  • Sexual Harassment - A student has asked an employee for a date on several occasions. The employee has rejected the invitations, but the student continues to request dates, becoming more aggressive in his approach. The employee feels comfortable and avoids leaving the office, which has impacted her ability to do her job.
  • Non-Consensual Sexual Contact – A student grabs the breast of another student without permission. As a result, the student who was grabbed no longer feels safe on campus.
  • Sexual Exploitation - Two students have sex, and one video records the sexual act without permission of the other student. As a result, the student feels humiliated.
  • Sexual Exploitation - A staff member looks over the bathroom stall to watch a campus member use the facility. As a result, the person in the stall feels humiliated and unsafe on the campus.

College Procedure

Sexual Misconduct offenses include, but are not limited to: Sexual Harassment, Non-Consensual Sexual Contact (or attempts to commit same), Non-Consensual Sexual Intercourse (or attempts to commit same), or Sexual Exploitation.

  • Sexual Harassment is unwelcome, gender-based verbal or physical conduct that is sufficiently severe, persistent, or pervasive and has the effect of unreasonably interfering with, denying, or limiting someone the ability to participate in or benefit from CCD’s educational program and/or activities, or work activities, and the unwelcome behavior may be based on power differentials (quid pro quo), the creation of a hostile environment, or retaliation.
  • Non-Consensual Sexual Contact is any intentional sexual touching, however slight, with any object, by any individual upon any individual that is without consent and/or by force.
  • Non-Consensual Sexual Intercourse is any sexual penetration however slight, with any object, by any individual upon any individual that is without consent and/or by force.
  • Sexual Exploitation occurs when anyone takes non-consensual or abusive sexual advantage of another for his/her own advantage or benefit, or to benefit or advantage anyone other than the one being exploited, and that behavior does not otherwise constitute one of the other sexual misconduct offenses.

Read CCD Full Procedure
HR-7: Sexual Harassment Procedure